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20131202
20131210
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
responsibility to look at how people have made it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper, some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world and to future generations. and i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a marked economy that is the greatest generation of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs and we're rugged individualists and that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think, you know
's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper, some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world and to future generations. and, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet, but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a market economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers. we're entrepreneurs. and we're rugged individualists. and that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world, because they think, you know what, i'm not going to be held back by conventions and traditions, i'm going to go out there and make
it in this country. >> yeah. there's no great religion that doesn't speak to this. at root, every great religion has some equivalent of the golden rule, some equivalent of the idea that i am my brother's keeper and my sister's keeper. some notion that even as we each take individual responsibility for acting in a responsible and righteous way, part of our obligation is to the larger world. and to future generations. you know, i think pope francis is showing himself to be just an extraordinarily thoughtful and soulful messenger of peace and justice. i haven't had a chance to meet him yet. but everything that i've read, everything that i've seen from him indicates the degree to which he is trying to remind us of those core obligations. and as i said in my speech yesterday, we live in a economy that is the greatest generator of wealth in history. we're risk takers, we're entrepreneurs, and we're rugged individuals. that's part of what makes us great. that's why we continue to be a magnet for strivers from all around the world. they think i'm not going to be held back by conventions and traditions. i'm
on either race, ethnicity, religion, preference, any of the signs of bigotry have to be addressed and not. and i think it just takes time. we're learning. we are still evolving. we are a better country today than we were 20 years ago, 30 years ago. we still have a ways to go. >> when you cast that vote in 19 yivenlgs you can look back and say within four years nelson mandela is released. four years after that, democratic elections, he becomes the president. did you think history was going to play out like that in 1986? did you think the struggle was going to take longer than that? >> i had no idea. in fact, i had no way of knowing how nelson mandela once being freed would react. my wife and i had the opportunity to visit robben island and stand in his cell and look out into the courtyard where he spent so many years crushing rocks. i felt a sense of rage welling up inside of me having think nelson mandela having spent so many years in prison could come out and walk tall and straight and say that he wanted to seek rec sill dwrags. that's an extraordinary statement i had no way of knowing w
where they are from, no matter their race or religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> nelson mandela did not pretend to be a saint and the coverage has taken note of some of his mistakes but and he was symbol, a courageous are moral leader, the coverage can barely convey. >> everyone prize themselves on scoring points for one side or another. it was nice to see a story for once where the "new york post," "new york times," mother jones everyone was in agreement that we lost a great man. that was refreshing. >> there's been a little bit of point scoring. "huffington post" put up how right let nelson mandela down. but there does seem to be an absence of cynicism and everybody feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> can i just say, even on twitter, i think we're not used -- we forgot about the time when there was no snark and have a conversation and say he was a great person. it was interesting to see some of the old coverage dusted off, like this weekend interview with dick cheney he s
, their religion, nelson mandela's name will be among them. >> he did not pretend to be 10 saint. coverage has taken note mistakes but he was such a courageous moral leader and a symbol the coverage can barely convey his legacy. what struck you most about the continuing coverage leading up to this? >> it was refreshing we live in an age where everyone prides himself on scoring points for one side or another and the media is increasingly partisan and polarized and it was nice to see a story where new york post and "new york times" and mother jones believed the world left one of the greatest men ever. >> this is legitimate debate about apartheid in the 80's but there is an absence of cynicism and snarking and everyone feeling like we have witnessed the passing of a guy who spent 27 years in prison and came out to be a tremendous leader. >> even on twitter, we are not used to us, we have forgotten when there was no snark and quote have a conversation and say we are sad, he was great person and it was refreshing to see that. not just the old coverage dusted off like the interview with dick cheney
. the fact that they're using religion to try to get this overturned is really one of the lowest points of their ole party push to destroy the president as well as the health care for all. so that one kicked me in the belly, i'll tell you that. people out there listening to that, please realize that women especially will be able to have more health care than they ever had when this thing is up and running the correct way. >> elizabeth plank, good luck with what you're doing today at the white house, thanks to both of you. >>> we are expecting the president to make remarks from washington, d.c. coming up in just a few minutes. here's a live look. when that happens, we'll bring those remarks to you in full. once again the president will join chris matthews in a town hall from american university tomorrow at 7:00 p.m. eastern on "hardball." you don't want to miss it. >>> so a question for you, do republicans really believe racism is over? well, a tweet this week from the rnc about rosa parks is raising questions about whether republicans get it when it comes to race. they have said that th
who knows bit. father jonathan morris, fox news religion contributor. just in general, what is your gut reaction. >> you shouldn't have $557 worth of drinks otherwise, very skeptical. you know what? i think reaction against this pastor, we don't even need to say his name, who said, i give 10% to god, why do i have to give you 18%, that is not a very kind thing. maybe he had a bad day who knows, right? jenna: sure. >> the reaction is a very good one, it is a very good, kind, holy christian thing to do to actually decide i will give more than i have to, more than i'm requested of or what the social norms would tell me to do. doesn't have to be every time but i think it's a very good positive thing. i love to see people doing it. jenna: brings a good question at end of the year, when you look at chairman giving and wonder how you may donate. >> yeah. jenna: 10% mark that is out there and been there for a long time. >> right. jenna: how far above to go? are you still in good graces if you can't do the 10%? not everybody will be able to sit down and, they would love to tip somebody good
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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